Philosophy & Influences

Philosophy

Any Age & Any Level Welcome! 

I enjoy an interactive student teacher relationship. Questions make my job a lot easier. The direction of our lesson plans will depend on the students available time and energy to put into setting acheivable measurable goals. Most situations call for good explanations which helps the student understand and build off of the info given rather then just a list of things to remember (especially if the list contradicts itself).

Learn how to practice productively! For those of you who do great practicing, but can't do it well on the course, we have to get you to bridge the gap from the range to the course. I have exercises that simulate playing from the range and we can practice on the course. 

  • Philosophy on teaching advanced and intermediate golfers:
    • Figure out your weaknesses and address them. 
    • Short game
    • Course management
    • Understand impact. (cause and effect)
    • Compose a training schedule, like a triathlete.
  • General swing Philosophies and theories. For beginners:
    • People’s instinct is to get underneath the ball to help the ball up. But that's not correct for golf, its counterintuitive. For example you hit down to make the ball go up and swing left to make the ball go right.
    • You're swinging a crooked stick. Every other sport uses a relatively flat tool. (paddles, raquettes, bats, etc.) Golf is rather a bag full of sticks more crooked then the next. It's a crazy world where up is down and left is right. (purposely redundant)
    • Knowing is half the battle- Many times I have taught a lesson and after just a good description of what is meant to happen and why people end up fixing themselves. Did I mention how important it is to get comfortable with the concept of hitting down?
    • Hitting a Golf ball is like hammering a nail. We need to know the direction the nail is pointing, so that we can swing the hammer in that direction. And in golf what way do you think the nail is pointing...? DOWN!
  •    Philosophy for teaching beginners whose goal is to learn golf for social fun:
    • Don’t be intimidated- people in general are so worried about themselves they don’t worry about other people.
    • Get on the course to watch other people golfing. This puts the game into context and gives you an idea of what people are doing and when. It also gives you the scale of the game. Watching golf on TV isn’t very practical for beginning golf and can be intimidating to someone wanting to pick up the game.
    • Learning what golfers care about is important. Golfers care about safety. They don't want to be paired up with someone who doesn't know where to go or when to swing. They also don't like waiting. Pace of play takes some understanding. 
    • Understanding how the ball goes in the air is vital to understanding why the ball goes where it does. Keep swing thoughts simple, and understandable. You need to know why the ball goes where it does. 
    • Practice
  • Philosophy for teaching juniors:
    • Fun! Fun! Fun! Don’t get me wrong, safety is by far most important, but it doesn’t have to sacrifice fun.
    • Game Based Learning, camaraderie and confidence building.
    • My advise to parents is to have your child learn before around 13 years old. Even if they don’t continue with golf it will become easier to pick it up again when you’re older. I believe almost everyone in the US tries hitting a golf ball at least once in their life.
    • Private and small groups lessons are more focused on mechanics and techniques. Groups are a guided practice. 

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Influences:
 

 

 Click Here for Work History

 

  • Hogan's 5 fundamentals
  • The Golf Machine
  • Mark Evershed CPGA - Canadian PGA Teacher of the Year- Mark and I have worked closely together since 2005. I have traveled to teach schools with Mark. He will also come and stay with me. Please contact me if you want to set up a school here.
  • David Stevenson PGA - I have worked with Dave since 2002. We have spent countless hours together working on golf both teaching and learning. 
  • Lloyd Monroe PGA - PGA Tour, Senior PGA Tour, European Tour, Senior European Tour and Super Senior Tours. I have worked with Lloyd since 2003. I lived with him for a winter in Florida playing in Mini-Tour events. We worked together daily on every aspect of the game. Including everything in life that it takes to become a tour player. 
  • Bobby Heinz PGA - Golf Digest #5 Top Teacher in New York State. 2008 Met Open Senior Champion. I am lucky that Bobby is so close and generous with his time. Bobby's teaching, especially when it come to short game has been a strong influence. 
  • Mike Bennett and Andy Plummer of Stack and Tilt PGA - This past winter I had the opportunity to work closely with both Mike and Andy becoming a Network Instructor of the Stack and Tilt method. They are very knowledgeable. Andy was ranked #2 instructor in the State of New Jersey this past year by Golf Digest. 
  • Over the years I have had the opportunity to work and play with many golf professionals, some of whom I don't remember their names. I want to aknowledge their influence as well. Michaeal JackMack PGA, David Grygiel PGA, Kyle Louvar PGA, Micheal Diffley PGA Golf Digest #6 teacher in New York State, and many many more.
  • Attended 2015 PGA Teaching and Coaching Summit - Speakers included Paul Hurrion, Sean Foley, Chuck Cook, Nancy Lopez, Jason Dufner, Butch Harmon, David Leadbetter, Jim Hardy, Jim McLean, Mike Adams and Greg Norman
  • 3 years PGM @ New Mexico State University & Methodist College
    • Focused on swing dynamics and philosophies 

 


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